Saturday, October 18, 2014

on caste and more

It's one month ago now. Two conversations. One in which I participated. One which I heard about second-hand a couple of hours later. But there they are - both running around my mind ever since ... and annoying me. So it is back to the purge-by-posting strategy.

The first conversation was with a bunch of Christian university graduates. It was about the ongoing presence of caste in Indian society, including the church. Caste had reasonable vocational origins, but now it is a way to keep people separate and then to value some much more than others. A student related to me that when his denomination gathers for it's annual assembly, they divide up according to caste. What?! Haven't these guys heard about Ephesians 2, Galatians 3 - and a bunch of other passages?

It makes me combust. It just does. But when we are about to combust, it is always good to pause, stop the flow of oxygen, and ask 'why'. Self-awareness is always a friend. For me, it is more than a biblical-theological issue. I can see this. As I approach leadership and community and mission, 1 Corinthians 12 may have taken on creedal proportions - but there is more to it than this.

As a child, stuff happened that makes me sensitive to nonbelongingness. It will always be that way. I am from New Zealand. We are so flat and egalitarian. Hierarchy is hated. We have a thing called the 'tall poppy syndrome'. As soon as someone grows too tall and excellent, standing out from the mediocre crowd, we have ways and means to cut down that poppy - or just wither it into lifelessness by a welter of sarcasm. Plus I now work in a UK-based organisation and I see a bit of caste in this class-y society. The era of Downtown Abbey did not rid it of all vestiges of the upstairs:downstairs way of life. I feel it - just as my Dad felt it when he went to work in the UK at my age, three decades ago. Self-awareness? These are some of the factors that light-up my combustible contribution into any conversation on caste.

But then there was a second conversation. I didn't hear it myself. Barby, my wife, heard it and related it to me. Again, a Christian graduate student. She has lived life in multiple places around the world. One simple observation. 'You guys in the West spend a lot of money on leisure.'

Boom. Hmm. Wow. Ugh. Ouch. As you can see, a highly articulate conversation has been triggered inside me.

Is she saying that leisure is wrong? I fantasize about sneaking a week here and there with Barby in some oddly exotic place. Is that wrong? I don't think so. Next month we are having our first 'longer-than-one-week' holiday in four years. Do I feel guilty? Of course not. Truth be told, I feel guilty that it has taken this long a time! Leisure. Rest. Lying fallow. These are good things.

What this woman couldn't understand is the amount of money we spend on leisure - and, I guess, this reflects the huge space it occupies in our imaginations and dreams, our goals and priorities. What I hear her saying is that 'in a world where there is so much need and inequity, how do you justify spending so much money not just on legitimate things like an education and a home - but on your leisure?

Is she onto something here? Of course she is. What is wrong with my self-awareness that I can't see this as clearly as she does? While I've been combusting over Ephesians 2 and Galatians 3, she has been reading much of Luke's gospel and a whole lot of the prophets. And out she comes with disturbing stuff, exposing blindspots in my reading of the Bible and my following of Jesus.

Nah - I don't really want to purge-by-posting. Filling, not flushing, is what I want. I want to get close enough to people like this that they tell me stuff that annoys me, triggering conflictual conversations in my head that help me be more faithful to the gospel with my life. I am asking the Spirit to help me combust as much over leisure's overspending as I do over caste's undervaluing.

nice chatting

Paul

3 comments:

Tim Bulkeley said...

And I think the leisure spending is new. My parents spent very little on leisure (the odd train ride into town to visit museums etc. the very occasional cream tea, and annual car ride or before that train to the country for holiday at my grandmother's) books came from the library, films were once a year or so, they almost never went to restaurants... We spend much more, and our children...

Paul Windsor said...

Ne'er a truer word, Tim.

When I returned from India to New Zealand, the thing that stunned me was how much Kiwis spent on dogfood and catfood. There was entire aisle devoted to it the supermarket. There are still vestiges of shock inside me, as I walk that way...

While turning back the clock is not an option, stewarding resources more wisely and with an eye on God's global community most certainly is.

I think 'coffees' might be a good place to start :). I am amazed at some peoples' annual coffee budget :)

Tim Bulkeley said...

I think that phrase "a good place to start" is important. For many it could certainly be coffee, for others it might be wine, for others Sky TV... the problem is a lot of us don't start.

Since you mention pets, the best discussion I saw on Carey's Moodle was when I posted a question about whether we should pay $500 for vet treatment for our cat, or send the $500 to the refugees on the Thai Burma border. That question revealed a lot about many Westerners view of pets!